Dabbing at the Edge of the World: November ’18 Roundup

DAB

When this post goes live, I will be on the other side of the country. And jeez, my country is a big country. You can literally get from my state to New Zealand, twice, in the time it takes to travel from one coast to another. But hey, that leaves plenty of time for reading! Or, as it turns out, watching the entirety of Noelle Stevenson’s She-Ra (and injecting magical girl warrior energy directly into the veins to quell flying anxieties. It works surprisingly well!).

Since I’ve been travelling and busily conference-going, there perhaps aren’t as many links as there usually are in the roundup this month. But, as the year winds down, I’m sure we can expect plenty of Good Stuff celebrating the media that has shaped 2018 (I’m particularly excited for the 12 Days of Anime posts that… people who aren’t me diligently put out every year). As for this little corner of the internet, if you like my mythology-meets-pop culture posts, I have an exciting new series (that’s right!) coming your way soon.

On the blog this month:

Queer YA Mini-Reviews: Music, Mythology, and Murder Mystery (not one, not two, but three book reviews as I try out a new format showcasing the versatility of the YA genre and show off how much I’m reading)

“It’s Not Over ’til it’s Over”: The Post-Apocalyptic Optimism of Girls Last Tour (a discussion of a surprisingly heartfelt and gentle story set after the end of the world that rolled out of nowhere to be one of my favourite anime I’ve watched this year)

Cool web content:

In which Polygon publishes the results of a Very Important Investigation about the books you can find in Skyrim. It ends up being not only quite funny but also a lesson in effective worldbuilding!

Impossibilities in Translating Queerness: Suki or Not Suki? – the team that brought us the Queerness Quadrants theory I linked to last time continues their dive into the ins and outs of queer analysis of anime, this time launching into linguistics and how sometimes love can literally get lost in translation.

ConCrit in Comments Only: What Writing Fanfiction Taught Me as an Editor – a professional editor who embraces her fanficcy past talks about why it shouldn’t be shrugged off as work with no merit, as it can teach writers (and readers, and editors) valuable skills about worldbuilding, consistency, and what draws an audience to a story.

How Writers Map Their Imaginary Worlds – a neat piece from Atlas Obscura about the map-making and worldbuilding methods of various authors.

The Flower Language of Bloom Into You (Part One) (Part Two) – Emily Rand brings her knowledge of flower symbolism to an in-depth analysis of the visual symbolism in Bloom Into You.

Why the “Closeted Homophobe” Trope Needs to Die – you know how if someone is really mean to gay people it definitely just means they’re secretly gay themselves and are angry about it so they’re turning their self-loathing into external bullying? You know how that’s actually a really dumb and harmful stereotype? Vrai goes through the history of the trope in fiction, its real-world implications, and exactly why it’s so nasty in this essay.

That wraps us up for November. Now, soon I have another plane to catch, so I suppose I will get to more reading and see you on the other side (…of the country). Take care!

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3 Comments

Filed under Monthly Roundups

3 responses to “Dabbing at the Edge of the World: November ’18 Roundup

  1. Haha, I love that you used my country as the example ‘end of the earth’ type place. Then again, maybe that’s only fair given that NZ seems to be consistently left off so many maps…

    • Haha, I didn’t even think of it that way–it’s just true that it’s faster to get from New South Wales to New Zealand (a whole ‘nother country) than it is to get from New South Wales to Western Australia, which is something I find kind of funny. Though it also makes me want to visit NZ again sometime–I find it quite nice, edge of the world or not 😛

  2. I cannot leave a like anymore for some reason so commenting because I like (and some interesting reading for later).

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